Tag Archives: history

West African Jollof Rice

5 Jun

This is another one of the recipes  that I first made while watching the World Cup last summer. The other being my Brazilian Bean Patties. I decided to make a dish from one of the countries playing in each match. This recipe was from when England played Ghana. There are many different variations on Jollof rice from all over West Africa but nearly all are tomato based with whatever vegetables you have, or are in season, added.

Most versions also contain chicken, which I have obviously left out. If you want to add the chicken just fry off some chicken pieces first to colour them then remove them from the pan, continue with the rest of the recipe and then add the chicken pieces back in when you add the stock.

The Washer Up pointed out that it is very similar to Paella and I had to agree. I think this would have something to do with the fact that Paella came to Spain during the Moorish occupation. It is believed to be a derivation of a Pilaf or Pilau and you can see that in the name.  The Arabs were also in West Africa for a long time controlling the slave trade in that area so obviously would have had an influence on their cuisine also. It makes sense doesn’t it. So Pilau, Paella, Pilaf  and Jollof could all have started out as one dish that over the centuries has been adapted by many different cultures and adopted as part of their own food heritage.

West African Jollof Rice Recipe

serves 4, vegan, gluten-free

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 chilli, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • a pinch of dried chilli flakes
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 – 1 litre (2 – 4 cups) veg stock
  • 2  ripe tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 small green pepper, diced
  • 1oo gr cooked kidney beans, rinsed & drained
  • 50 gr frozen peas (I used a peas & sweetcorn mix)
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 400 gr (2 cups) wholegrain rice
  • 150 ml tomate frito/tomato passata/puree
  • fresh parsley, chopped for garnish

Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the onions, herbs, spices, salt & black pepper and cook until the onions have softened (about 5 minutes). Then add the garlic, fresh chilli & ginger and cook for another minute.

Next add in the chopped vegetables and tomatoes and cook until the vegetables are partly cooked(5 -8 minutes).

Stir in the rice then add the tomato puree and stir over a low heat to coat the rice. Next add 1/2 litre of stock, season with salt & black pepper and bring to the boil. Lower the heat and simmer, over a low heat, covered until the rice and vegetables are cooked and all the stock has been absorbed. (About 25 minutes). Stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan and add more veg stock if necessary, a cup at a time, to stop it becoming dry before the rice is cooked.

Check for seasoning and serve garnished with fresh parsley.

Things that made me smile today…

Giant Dandelions…?

Make a wish Rufus….!

The Land of Abandoned Towers

21 Sep

The Water Tower

This is a view from where we begin our walks with the dog. This mysteriously abandoned folly has never been inhabited & isn’t very old. Apparently it was used in the soap Eldorado as the setting for the kidnapped Pilar in one of the final episodes. There are quite a few stories as to why it was built, the most popular being that some developers wanted to build an urbanization in the area behind known as La Mota. The Ayuntamiento (town hall) would only grant permission if they built a water tower that blended in with the local area. The Water Tower made it but the Urbanization still hasn’t been built. There is a huge amount local opposition who disagree with the proposed housing estate & another unnecessary golf course being built in an area of natural beauty. We just don’t have the resources & infrastructure to cope with what we have now let alone more housing & golf greens which use up scarce water supplies. 

Anyway enough ranting the resulting water tower is now a local landmark visible from most areas around including our roof terrace. I think it’s rather imposing! 

Torre De Hurique

The Torre de Hurique is a 12th Century farmhouse tower built by the moors who ruled in Andalucia for nearly eight centuries. They are known for introducing trade, agriculture, irrigation & hydraulic systems to the area. The function of the tower was to announce  enemies & to provide protection & shelter to the people of the area. The tower itself now stands empty but there are numerous farm houses attached to it with small holdings around the area still using the irrigation systems. 

Torre Hurique surrounded by small farms

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