Tag Archives: toasted

Quick Indian Spiced Broccoli with Yellow Lentils and Toasted Almonds

13 Feb

Indian Broccoli and Lentils

I bought some lovely tender stem broccoli from the farmer’s market on Sunday. I wanted to elevate it to top billing in a dish rather than the, green vegetable on the side of something else, that it can so often be thoughtlessly demoted to.

Tender Stem Broccoli

One of the most successful recipes on my blog (as in most viewed) is a delicious broccoli as the star dish. It’s my version of an Ottolenghi recipe for Chargrilled Broccoli with Garlic, Chilli & Sweet Soy Rice Noodles. It’s still one of The Washer Up’s favourites, and mine. I don’t make it as often as I would like because chargrilling the broccoli on  my striped grill pan fills the kitchen (and the rest of the house) with smoke. Our extractor fan is useless. I think it actually blows the smoke into the kitchen rather than extracting it, so I have to leave the front door open to let it all out. It might need cleaning I suppose. *Buries head in sand*.

Indian Spiced Broccoli & Lentils

This is a quick and easy supper or lunch dish that can be thrown together in about half an hour. That is a real 30 minutes by the way, not a Jamie Oliver 30 minutes. Which is more like 60 minutes in human time in case you were wondering.

Indian Broccoli & Lentils with Almonds

Indian Spiced Broccoli with Yellow Lentils and Toasted Almonds

Serves 2 as a light lunch/supper with some Indian bread. Easily doubled.

Vegan, Gluten-free

  • 2 tsp coconut oil (or any cooking oil)
  • about 225 g tender stem broccoli or florets
  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 green chilli, finely chopped (deseed for less heat)
  • 1 Tbsp minced ginger
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 125 g dried yellow lentils (or any quick cook lentil)
  • 250 g + veg stock
  • salt & black pepper
  • a handful of chopped fresh coriander
  • 1/2 lemon
  • a handful of flaked almonds (or cashews) toasted in a dry pan until lightly browned

Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium high heat, add the cumin seeds & mustard seeds and cook until they start to pop. Add in the onion, garlic, chilli & ginger with a pinch of salt and cook for about 4 minutes until softened. Then add the lentils, turmeric and ground coriander stirring to coat the lentils and pour in 250 ml stock.

Bring to the boil then lower the heat  and simmer, covered for about 12 minutes (depending on the lentils) until they are tender soft. Lay the broccoli on top of the lentils and add a good splash of veg stock, season well with salt & pepper, bring to the boil again then lower the heat and simmer, covered again for about 5 minutes until the broccoli is tender but still crisp.

Add most of the fresh coriander and a squeeze of lemon juice and taste. Adjust seasoning as required.

Serve topped with some toasted flaked almonds, the rest of the fresh coriander and a wedge of lemon to squeeze over.

Indian Broccoli & Yellow Lentils

And no need to use (or clean) the grill pan or the extractor. Result.

Indian Broccoli with Lentils

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Roasted Beetroot Hummus with Toasted Flatbread Crackers

1 Jan

Roasted Beetroot Hummus

Happy New Year Hummus!

Surprisingly, my most popular (or most visited) post of 2012 was this traditional hummus recipe. I don’t know why but if you search for Hummus or Hummus recipe in Google it’s right up there on the first page. Consequently I get loads of traffic from search engines. I should really learn how this all works. Maybe that should be my New Year’s resolution.

Baby Beetroot

The trouble is I’m too busy doing what I enjoy doing, which is cooking, to want to spend more time on the computer. So it’s probably not going to happen, but you never know. If someone had told me at the start of 2012 that by the end of the year I would be teaching Vegetarian Cookery Workshops at a cookery school in Spanish I would laughed in their face.

Roasting Beetroot

Speaking of which, this beautifully sweet, deliciously deep magenta coloured dip, is one of the dishes from the Middle Eastern inspired Christmas party menu workshop that I hosted in December. It formed part of a festive jewel coloured mezze that we all devoured with a glass of pink cava after everything was prepared. I will be sharing more of those recipes with you over the next few weeks.

Roasted Beet Hummus

I bought some little organic baby beets from the market which roasted in about 30-35 minutes but if you can only get larger ones, cut them in half or quarters and roast until they are tender all the way through. This could take up to an hour depending on their size. Use gloves when you rub the skins off, if you don’t want fuchsia fingers.

Roasted Beetroot Hummus Recipe

Serves 6-8 as a dip. Vegan, Gluten-Free

  • about 600 g beetroot
  • olive oil
  • salt & black pepper
  • thyme

Trim off the leaves, leaving about 2 inches of stalk attached and leave the root on. Cut into halves or quarters if large. Preheat the oven to 200 C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Lay the beets on the tray, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt & black pepper and some fresh or dried thyme leaves. Roast until tender all the way through. 30 mins to an hour depending on size. Leave to cool then cut off the stalks and roots and rub the skins off with kitchen paper.

  • 400 g cooked chickpeas (1 tin/jar) drained & rinsed
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3 Tbsp tahini
  • 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 small cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • salt & black pepper
  • sesame seeds & fresh dill for garnish (optional)

Roughly chop the beetroot and put half of it along with half of the chickpeas in a food processor and blend until finely chopped, scraping down the sides as necessary. Add the rest of the beetroot (saving some finely chopped for garnish) and the rest of the chickpeas and blend again to a paste, scraping down the sides.

Add the olive oil, tahini, lemon juice, cumin, salt & black pepper and blend to a smooth paste. Taste and adjust seasoning as required. Serve topped with some finely chopped beetroot, sesame seeds, a drizzle of olive oil and a sprig of fresh dill, if using.

Beetroot Hummus

Toasted Flatbread Crackers Recipe

vegan

  • lavash flatbread or soft flour tortillas
  • olive oil
  • salt & pepper
  • cumin
  • sumac (if available)

Preheat the oven to 125 C. Brush your lavash or tortillas with olive oil, sprinkle over some cumin, sumac (if using), salt & black pepper.

Using scissors, cut the lavash/tortillas into triangles and place on the baking tray(s). Cook for 10-15 mins until slightly golden and crispy, keep an eye on them. Leave to cool slightly (they will crisp up a bit more) and serve immediately with the hummus.

These crackers are also great served with Baba Ghanoush, Muhammara or even Guacamole.

Beet Hummus & Flatbread Chips

Happy New Year Everyone!!

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Sri Lankan Green Bean, Potato and Cashew Nut Curry

16 May

I saw Rick Stein making this curry on his Far Eastern Odyssey series. I watched every episode because he visited all the places I’d love to go; India, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam. Him eating his way around Asia just reinforced my desire. Even though he doesn’t cook much vegetarian food it still transports you there.

You know when you are watching a food programme and someone makes a dish that you just have to cook straight away. That’s what happened when I saw this dish. It’s like the planets align and you simultaneously have all the ingredients in the house and the perfect recipe. I love it when that happens……

The original recipe doesn’t have potatoes in it but calls for 300 gr cashew nuts. I didn’t have 300 gr of cashew nuts (who does?) so I padded it out with some baby new potatoes. The potatoes are great  because it means that you don’t have to make rice to go with it. It’s a one pot dish, which is always a bonus, less washing up.

It may seem like a lot of fuss to make you own Sri Lankan curry powder but it makes such a difference. You just toast the whole spices and then grind them in a spice grinder, coffee grinder or mortar & pestle. I did mine in a battery operated pepper mill, it took a while and it wasn’t really a powder but hey, afterwards you have a little jar of your own  Sri Lankan curry powder that you can bust out whenever you need a quick and delicious dinner.

Cinnamon has been cultivated in Sri Lanka for a very long time. About 90% of the world’s cinnamon comes from Sri Lanka making it a very important part of the history of the island.  It is made from fine curls of the inner bark of the cinnamon tree. Not surprisingly cinnamon plays an important part in the cuisine of Sri Lanka and, along with coconut, is found in nearly every dish.

Sri Lankan Green Bean, Potato & Cashew Nut Curry

Serves 2, vegan, gluten-free. Adapted from Rick Stein’s Far Eastern Odyssey

For the curry powder

I halved the original recipe feel free to double it again.

  • 1 tbsp coriander seeds
  • 1/2 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tbsp fennel seeds
  • 1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds
  • 1/2 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1/2 tbsp black mustard seeds
  • 3 green cardamoms
  • 1/2 cinnamon stick
  •  1 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 1/2 tsp rice

Toast all the spices in a dry pan for a few minutes until they release their aromas and start to pop. Cool them slightly and then grind in a spice grinder, coffee grinder or mortar & pestle. Tip into an airtight jar and store in a cool dry place.

For the Curry

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil (or coconut oil)
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tbsp minced ginger
  • 1 green chilli, finely chopped
  • 1 stick lemongrass, bruised & finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp Sri Lankan curry powder (see above)
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tin 400 ml coconut milk (I used low-fat)
  • about 400 ml veg stock
  • a handful of curry leaves (if you can find them)
  • 2oo gr green beans, trimmed & cut into thirds
  • 350 gr baby new potatoes, quartered
  • 150 gr cashew nuts, plus extra for garnish
  • 1 tbsp palm sugar (or brown sugar)
  • 1 lime, 1/2 juiced 1/2 cut into wedges
  • salt
  • 1 tsp cornflour, to thicken if necessary

Heat the oil in a large pan or wok over a medium heat. Add in the cinnamon, garlic, ginger, chilli, lemongrass, turmeric and the Sri Lankan curry powder. Fry until the aromas develop but don’t let it burn. Add the coconut milk then fill up the coconut milk tin with veg stock and add that too, mix well.

Stir in the potatoes, green beans, curry leaves and cashew nuts (save some for garnish).  Bring to the boil, season well with salt then add the sugar & lime juice. Lower the heat and simmer for 25 – 30 minutes until the potatoes are tender.

If it seems a bit too liquidy. Stir a teaspoon of cornflour into a few tablespoons of water until dissolved, add this to the pan and stir. Cook for a few more minutes until thickened.

Serve in warm bowls topped with more toasted cashew nuts and the lime wedges.

Enjoy!!

Things That Made Me Smile Today

Dandelions……..

Daisies…….

Rufus in a daisy chain….

Make a daisy chain if you see some. It’s like being a kid again…..

Green Vegetable Minestrone with Toasted Pine Nuts

4 May

May Day here is known as Dia de la Cruz “Day of the Cross”. It is also Dia de los Verdes “Day of the Greens”. In Alhaurin there are two main churches known as The Greens & The Purples (the colours of the Andalucian flag). For the whole long weekend and Tuesday the Green Church known asVera Cruz have processions, marching bands and let off rockets very early in the morning and very late at night.

Thankfully it stopped raining long enough to get out and take some photos this week.

I can’t pretend to know what it’s all about but they seem to enjoy it and it brings the community (well one half of it anyway) together. Rows of different types of chairs are tied together all along the procession route so no one can steal a precious front row seat.

After the processions everyone congregates at the church.

Everyone is wearing green. Purple is a definite faux-pas. Unless you are our friend Miguel, who was over from England with his girlfriend Lindsey for the Bank Holiday. He decide to rock it in lilac jeans, despite all the funny looks, classic Miguel, hilarious….!!

So in keeping with this green weekend and to atone slightly for the purple jeans incident I have made a Green Vegetable Minestrone. This is my favourite soup that we served at the restaurant. I got it from a Cape Town cookbook my Dad gave to me. It is really fresh tasting and more Springy than a classic Minestrone. You can use whatever green veg you like just make sure you give it loads of fresh basil…

I kept it vegan & gluten-free by using rice vermicelli. You can use any pasta you like but keep it tiny. Freshly shaved parmesan on top is the authentic addition that I replaced with toasted pine nuts. Either way it’s a deliciously healthy bowl of goodness that leaves you feeling all virtuous inside…

Green Vegetable Minestrone with Toasted Pine Nuts

serves 6 , vegan, gluten-free. Adapted from Cape Town Food by Phillippa Cheifitz

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 big Spanish spring onion (or 4 or 5 scallions)
  • 1 leek, halved lengthways, rinsed & finely sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, finely sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • a handful of fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 small cabbage, cored & finely shredded
  • 125 gr green beans, 2 cm diagonal slices
  • 1 courgette, diced
  •  bundle of asparagus, woody ends snapped off, 2cm diagonal slices
  • 100 gr frozen peas
  • 50 gr rice vermicelli (or other tiny pasta) 
  • 150 gr rocket (or spinach/watercress)
  • 1+ 1/2 litres veg stock
  • salt & black pepper
  • a big bunch of basil, leaves torn or sliced when served
  • 25 gr pine nuts, toasted in a dry pan
  • extra virgin olive oil for drizzling
  • shaved parmesan (unless vegan)

Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over a medium heat, add in the spring onions, leeks & celery with a pinch of salt and cook until starting to soften about 3 minutes. Stir in the garlic & parsley and cook for another minute or two.

Add in the cabbage and cook gently for about 10 minutes (you don’t want it to brown) add a splash of stock if dry. Then add in the rest of the vegetables, except the rocket and basil, and cook for another 5 minutes. Season well with salt & black pepper, pour over the stock, bring to the boil, cover, lower the heat & simmer for about 25 minutes.

Stir in the pasta and rocket and cook until tender about 5 minutes. Check seasoning and add more stock if you want it more soupy than stewy.

Ladle into warm bowls and sprinkle over lots of freshly torn basil, the toasted pine nuts and shaved parmesan (if using). Finish with a drizzle of extra virgin.

I think Los Verdes would approve don’t you?

Green Bean Pilaf with Toasted Almonds, Pine Nuts and Raisins

8 Apr

I’ve decided to go on a detox diet for a month to see if I can lose some weight. It means no meat (obviously), eggs, dairy, wheat, sugar or alcohol for a month. My friend has lent me a Carol Vorderman detox book that has some good recipes in it that I am using as a base to work from. They are all quite basic in the flavour department so I will be amping up the spices to make sure every dish is delicious and full of flavour as well as healthy. I don’t want it to feel like I am on a diet or that I am being deprived and I definitely don’t want the food to be boring in any way.

I started about a week ago and I am definitely noticing a difference. I feel less bloated, lighter and less hungry, which is surprising. This is my breakfast smoothie that I am having every day. It is one or two crushed ice cubes blended with 1 banana, 5 or 6 strawberries, a big slice of pineapple, the juice of half an orange and a handful of oats. It is a lovely way to start the day and keeps me full until lunchtime which is great because I walk/jog 4.5km every morning with the dog.

This was my first vegan gluten-free meal, as you can see there is a little bit of crumbled Feta on the top, but that was the last of it I promise… Well I’m not promising anything really. That’s too much pressure and there is an amazing vegetarian “Scotch Egg” & piccalilli recipe that I am desperate to try. The only thing I am promising is that there will never be a boring, tasteless, bland recipe on this blog so don’t worry. I have plenty of exciting South American, South East Asian, Middle Eastern and Indian recipes up my sleeve that you wouldn’t even know were detox, so here we go…

Green Bean Pilaf with Almonds, Pine Nuts & Raisins

serves 4, vegan & gluten-free without the Feta. Adapted from Carol Vorderman’s Detox Recipes

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 leek, sliced in half lengthways, rinsed & finely sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/4 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 300 gr wholegrain (brown) rice
  • 1 litre veg stock
  • 225 gr green beans, trimmed & halved
  • 30 gr pine nuts
  • 30 gr flaked almonds
  • 50 gr raisins (I used moscatel they are bigger & juicier)
  • a handful of fresh parsley, chopped plus leaves for garnish
  • a handful of mint leaves, finely chopped
  • salt & black pepper
  • greek feta (optional)

Toast the pine nuts and almonds in a dry frying pan, shaking occasionally until browned. Don’t take your eyes off of them or they will burn. Set aside to cool.

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Add the onion, leeks and a pinch of salt and cook for about 5 minutes until softened but not browned then add in the garlic and cook for a minute more.

Add the coriander, cumin and rice and cook, stirring for a minute until the grains are glossy. Add the veg stock and the raisins and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes until the liquid is almost absorbed and the rice is nearly cooked. Add the green beans, salt, pepper,stir, cover and cook for a further 5 minutes until the beans and rice are cooked. Stir through the chopped herbs, taste and serve sprinkled with the toasted almonds, pine nuts, a few parsley leaves and some crumbled feta (if using).

Wholegrain rice provides fibre, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B1 and iron that white rice does not. Leeks and onions are rich in allyl sulphides which are protective against heart disease and cancer as well as providing folate and vitamin C. Pine nuts & almonds provide protein & calcium and are super-rich in heart healthy vitamin E and monounsaturated oils.

All that and it tastes great too, enjoy!!

Rustic Bean Cassoulet with confit garlic and roasted aubergine

19 Jan

The idea for this recipe came from Lindsay at The Kitchen Operas. We have very similar taste in food so when she said that garlic confit was even better than roasted garlic I knew I had to try it out. She wasn’t wrong. The mellow, soft, sweetness of the garlic is a revelation and you also have a gorgeous garlic & herb infused olive oil to use for drizzling over salads, pasta dishes and bread. The possibilities are endless…..

Confit is a method of preserving and flavouring foods by submerging them in a substance, in this case olive oil…..

Garlic Confit Recipe

Recipe from The Kitchen Operas

  • 20 garlic cloves, peeled
  • enough extra virgin olive oil to cover the garlic cloves about 60 ml
  • a pinch of salt
  • 3 whole peppercorns
  • 1 sprig rosemary/thyme
  • 1 bay leaf

Preheat the oven to 160C. Put all the ingredients in an ovenproof ramekin making sure all the garlic is submerged. Cover with foil and bake for 1 hour until the garlic is tender. Leave to cool and store in a glass jar topping up with more olive oil, to cover, if necessary, then refrigerate.

Now you have deliciously soft, sweet cloves of garlic to do with what you will. I wanted to use mine straight away because they smelled so amazing. So I decided to go with Lindsay and attempt a Cassoulet. A cassoulet is a bean stew from the South of France generally made with pork sausage or bacon and duck confit. Having already replaced the duck confit with garlic confit (very clever Lindsay), I was wondering how you could replace the bacon/sausage. Aubergine takes on a smoky flavour when roasted and has that dense meaty texture required in this dish so that’s what I went with.  I roasted an aubergine & a red onion at the same time as confiting the garlic. I also saw a recipe for Shitake Bacon where you roast slices of Shitake mushrooms in olive oil, salt & pepper for about 45 minutes and they take on that salty, smoky flavour and crispy texture of the bacon. That would be a fantastic alternative and next time I get some Shitakes I’m definitely trying it.

Rustic Bean Cassoulet with confit garlic & roasted aubergine

Adapted from a Kitchen Operas recipe. Serves 3, vegetarian

  • 1 aubergine, cut into  1 or 2 cm dice
  • 1 red onion, peeled and cut into eighths, wedges
  • 2 or 3 tbsp olive oil
  • salt & black pepper
  • a pinch of chilli flakes
  • 2 leeks, cut in half lengthways, rinsed & sliced
  • 2 carrots, diced (I used 1/2 a large sweet potato because I had no carrots)
  • 2 stalks celery & leaves finely chopped
  •  6 confit garlic cloves (see recipe above)
  • 1/2 tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • a splash of white/rose wine (optional)
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes 400 gr
  • 1/2 jar/tin 200 gr cooked red beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1 jar/tin 400 gr cooked white beans, rinsed & drained (I only had 1/2 jar)
  • 450 ml (2 cups) veg stock
  • salt & black pepper

Put the cubed aubergine & red onion wedges on a lined baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper & chilli flakes and toss together with your hands to coat evenly. Roast in the oven with the confit garlic or roast at 200C for about 25- 3o minutes until lightly browned.

In a large pot, heat up 2 tbsp olive oil over a medium heat and add in the leeks, celery, carrots/sweet potato, whole confit garlic cloves, herbs and season well with salt & black pepper. Cook for about 10 minutes stirring occasionally until softened and slightly golden. Add a splash of wine to deglaze the pan then add in the beans, tomatoes, roasted aubergine & red onion and the veg stock. Season again with salt, bring to the boil then lower the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, uncovered for about 20 – 25 minutes. Until the carrots/sweet potatoes are tender and the stew has thickened.

Serve in warmed bowls topped with garlic & rosemary toasted breadcrumbs and/or a slice of confit garlic bread….

Garlic & Rosemary Toasted Breadcrumbs

  • about 110 gr fresh breadcrumbs (the more rustic the better) I only had packet breadcrumbs
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • a drizzle of the garlic infused oil from the confit garlic
  •  1/2 tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • sea salt & black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180 C. Toss the breadcrumbs with the rest of the ingredients until evenly combined and spread out on a piece of foil. Toast in the oven for about 10 minutes until golden & aromatic.Scatter the breadcrumbs over the top of  your cassoulet just before serving.

Confit Garlic Bread

  • some slices of rustic bread or baguette
  • 1 or 2 confit garlic cloves per slice (see recipe above)
  • some garlic infused olive oil from the confit garlic
  • some grated cheese (I used Manchego) not very French!

Preheat the grill to hot. Smash/smush 1 or 2 cloves of the confit garlic all over the bread, drizzle with a little of the oil and top with grated cheese. Put under the hot grill for a minute or so until the cheese is bubbling and the bread is golden.

Bon Appetit!

My First Panettone with Mandarin Jam

11 Dec

Does breakfast get any better than this..

I don’t think so. This was my first experience of making panettone and it turned out pretty well. The taste is fantastic, it could have been a little lighter but that might have something to do with the electric cutting out halfway through cooking it! It does that here when it rains heavily, very annoying when you are slightly nervous about baking your first panettone and have just spent quite a long time getting the dough to rise…

My idea is to make mini ones as gifts for Christmas but I don’t have any little baking tins and I wanted to try it out on myself first before inflicting it on other people. The Washer Up said it was like a giant tea cake and there is nothing wrong with that!

The other thing I was desperate to make was mandarin jam with the mountain of mandarins we have here. I think a gift bag of a mini panettone & mandarin jam should make most people smile on Christmas morning, don’t you?

Panettone Recipe

makes an 8 or 9 inch round cake, vegetarian

adapted from “Pickle” by Ellie Jarvis http://elliejarvis.co.uk/

  • 125gr dried mixed fruit (I used 75gr sultanas & 50 gr dried cranberries)
  • grated zest of 1 lemon
  • grated zest of 2 mandarins(or 1 orange)
  • 1 tbsp cointreau (or grand marnier)
  • 125 ml milk
  • 1 level tbsp active dried yeast (1 sachet)
  • 50 gr caster sugar
  • 450 gr strong white bread flour (I used plain flour)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 large egg & 1 egg yolk, beaten
  • 1 tbsp honey (I used miel de cana)
  •  2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 75 gr butter, softened

Put the dried fruit in a bowl, cover with boiling water and leave to soak while you make the dough. Heat the milk until warm, remove from the heat, add the yeast, 1 tsp of the sugar and leave to activate for about 5 minutes. (A foam will form on the top).

Into a large bowl sieve together the flour, remaining sugar and salt, make a well in the centre and add the beaten eggs, milk & yeast mixture, honey, vanilla, cointreau and softened butter. Mix it together with a wooden spoon and then use your hands to form a soft dough and mix for a few minutes. Drain the fruit and dry with kitchen roll, add it to the dough along with the zests and knead it all together until well-distributed. Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface and knead for 1 or 2 minutes. Shape in to a ball, put it back in the bowl, cover with cling film and leave to rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes or until doubled in size.

Turn the risen dough out onto a floured work surface and knead again for 1 minute. Put it in your 8 or 9 inch cake tin which has been lined with baking paper and rubbed with oil. Cover with oiled cling film and leave to rise  again in a warm place for 1 – 1 1/2 hours. Preheat the oven to 17o degrees, brush with beaten egg or milk and bake in the bottom third of the oven for 35 – 40 minutes until browned & risen. Leave it to cool in the tin for 10 minutes then turn it out to cool completely on a wire rack.

Slice it like you would a loaf of bread and serve it toasted and smothered with butter & mandarin jam. ..

If you have never made jam before, this is a really good one to start with. It is easy, quick & delicious you will be so impressed with yourself that you will probably never buy jam again!

Mandarin Jam Recipe

makes 1 jam jar

  • 500 gr mandarins/ satsumas/tangerines
  • 250 gr sugar
  • the juice of 1 lemon

Wash 2 or 3 of the mandarins and zest them carefully. (you don’t want any of the white pith). Then peel all the mandarins removing as much of the pith and filaments as you can. Cut each mandarin in half around its middle and pick out any pips. (Do this over a bowl to collect any juice). Put the halves in the bowl aswell and blitz with a stick blender until you have a smoothish puree. (you can do this in a food processor).

Put the mandarin puree, zest, sugar and lemon juice in saucepan. Bring to the boil over a medium high heat then reduce the heat so it boils gently. Cook for 20-25 minutes stirring occasionally until it sets.  To check if it is set put a saucer in the freezer for a few minutes, then put a teaspoon of the hot jam onto it. Leave it to cool slightly then run your finger through the jam, if the line holds it’s set.

Pour into a hot, sterilized jar, (I pour boiling water in the clean jar and tip it out just before pouring in the jam) seal tightly, turn upside down and leave to cool. Store in the fridge when cool.

I was so pleased with how this jam turned out. The texture is perfect and it looks and tastes lovely. The perfect accompaniment to my homemade panettone!! I can’t believe I made panettone……

     
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Chica Andaluza

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